How we see ourselves

From a Wall Street Journal article on a Beijing exhibit called “Africa: See You, See Me!”.

The exhibition, currently showing at Li-Space in Beijing’s Caochangdi district is described by the curator Awem Amkpa as

an illustration of “how Africans want to be seen rather than how they are forced to be seen.”

You can read more here

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The most offensive article I have read in a while

What kind of colonial apologist bullshit is this? And what is it doing on what is supposed to be a respectable site like the Wall Street Journal?

 

This asshole...

Some choice quotes:

some new version of colonialism may be the best thing that could happen to at least some countries in the postcolonial world.

The colonialists of yore may often have been bigots, but they were also, just as often, doers. Their colonies were better places than the shipwrecked countries we have today.

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Link Africa

If you find something online that would be of interest to Vuga! readers and contributors, email tips to vugaafrica@gmail.com

Link Africa

Efé children of the Ituri Forest in Zaire (Rep. of Congo, central Africa) begin the Osani game by sitting in a circle, feet touching, all connected. Each child in turn names a round object like the sun (oi), the moon (tiba), a star (bibi) an eye (ue) and then goes on to name a figurative expression of “round” like the circle of the family, togetherness, a baby in the womb, or the cycle of the moon. As players fail to come up with a term that is “circular” they are eliminated from the game. Eventually, only one remains. Tradition has it that this player will live a long and prosperous life.

If you find something online that would be of interest to Vuga! readers and contributors, email tips to vugaafrica@gmail.com

Many stories matter

One of the goals of this online project is to enable Africans to tell their own, different stories about ourselves. We are tired of hearing the same old one.

In her TED talk, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie explains it more elegantly and beautifully than I can

“If all I knew about Africa were from popular images, I too would think that Africa was a place of beautiful landscapes, beautiful animals and incomprehensible people fighting senseless wars, dying of poverty and AIDS, unable to speak for themselves and waiting to be saved by a kind white foreigner. “

See it for yourself here, it’s worth the twenty minutes (and however long it takes you to load the thing on our slow African internet):

Also, if you have not yet read her books, shame on you!

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How to write about Africa

How to write about Africa

This amazing article by Binyavanga Wainana has been going around the internet for a while, but it is also worth a repeat performance:

Taboo subjects: ordinary domestic scenes, love between Africans (unless a death is involved), references to African writers or intellectuals, mention of school-going children who are not suffering from yaws or Ebola fever or female genital mutilation.

If you haven’t read it yet, you can find it here

So is positive coverage of the World Cup going to change any of this?