A bit of adorable for you

From the book I Am Because We Are: African Wisdom In Image and Proverb, by photojournalist Betty Press

Quick Question: If media articles on maternal health in Africa began with a photo like this, would donor funding dry up?

 

 

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This is Kampala

“At the heart of the country is Kampala. An urban planner’s nightmare, its fabled seven-hilled pulse spawns a sprawl of arterial slums pumping with people carving out a living. Its pot-holed roads are home to its three million inhabitants: a thrumming hive of informal trade where street vendors flog sunglasses, single cigarettes and Fong Kong clothing, and telecoms shanties scattered along the sidewalks sell sim cards under single neon light bulbs. There are no street lights. It’s left to the swarm of boda-boda motorcycles and matatu mini-bus taxis to light your way.”

Possibly one of the best descriptions of Kampala that I have ever read in this Red Bulletin preview; the bad, the ugly and the beautiful; the frenetic, the kinetic and the chaotic.

The article is on the amazing Breakdance Project Uganda. If you find yourself anywhere near a screening of the documentary Bouncing Cats, drop everything and go and see it, send me a thank you email later. It is fantastic. Featuring Crazy-Legs, K’naan and Mos Def, narrated by Common

Do we need to be called Afropolitan via @Afropopmag

As Anne says: “Our parents [and, in some cases, grandparents] were the pioneers of the global African, most having left their homes to pursue higher education. We are beneficiaries of their struggle to ensure our access to education and opportunity and, as such, I  feel as though we have the obligation to be bolder, more creative, more innovative in how we express ourselves and in how we represent the continent.  I will always consider myself an Afropolitan. It’s not a geographic construct, but a state of mind.”

How we see ourselves

From a Wall Street Journal article on a Beijing exhibit called “Africa: See You, See Me!”.

The exhibition, currently showing at Li-Space in Beijing’s Caochangdi district is described by the curator Awem Amkpa as

an illustration of “how Africans want to be seen rather than how they are forced to be seen.”

You can read more here

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Link Africa

 

From a gallery of images shot by Fred Bunde from the ‘The War is Over’ Campaign.

 

If you find something online that would be of interest to Vuga! readers and contributors, email tips to vugaafrica@gmail.com

Link Africa

If you find something online that would be of interest to Vuga! readers and contributors, email tips to vugaafrica@gmail.com

Link Africa

Now I look like an African (minus the whole white skin thing)!

If you find something online that would be of interest to Vuga! readers and contributors, email tips to vugaafrica@gmail.com