Link Africa

“Esther Yandakwa, age 9, Francine Nyanda, age 14, and Gladys Lutadila, age 14, Clarisse Bongalo, age 14, have their nails done on April 2006 in Matonge district in central Kinshasa, Congo, DRC. They are homeless and work as prostitutes together. They live outside, next to a polluted river. They have all run away from their parents. They have been living in a homeless shelter for children, but don’t like the rules there. They smoke cigarettes, marijuana, drink whiskey and sometimes take Valium. They charge their clients as little as one dollar. About 15,000 children are estimated to live on the streets of Kinshasa. After forty years of mismanagement by a corrupt dictator and former president Mobuto Sese Seko the Congo is in ruins. A civil war began there after he fled the country in 1997.”

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wochena vs wosachena

Came across this on the internet today and thought it was special and totally in the spirit of what we talk about here on Vuga!

Duncan McNicholl is a Canadian engineer working with engineers without borders in Malawi and an avid photographer. After returning home from Africa in 2008, he had a strong reaction to the representations of Africans that he saw in the media.

I compared these photos to my own memories of Malawian friends and felt lied to.  How had these photos failed so spectacularly to capture the intelligence, the laughter, the resilience, and the capabilities of so many incredible people? […] This is not to say that people do not struggle, far from it, but the photos I was seeing only told part of the story.  I thought that these images were robbing people of their dignity, and I felt that the rest of the story should be told as well.

And so he came up with a project he calls “Perspectives of Poverty” in which he photographs Africans both in the stereotypical way that they are represented by the Western media, and the way in which they want to be seen.


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