Imagine Uganda

If money was no object, what would you be doing with your life? If you did not have to worry about how your hypothetical future children would eat, or what your Aunty would say, or how you were going to pay the rent, what would be your reason to get up in the morning? If failure was not a possibility, how would you expend your passion? If there were no limits, what would you do with your life?

When my little sister was a kid, she wanted to be a marine biologist, hairdresser and makeup artist, all AT THE SAME TIME. Today she is about to graduate with a bachelor’s degree in Sociology and we are all very proud of her. At the same time I kind of miss the naïveté and optimism that would allow a little African girl, living in a landlocked country to want to be a marine biologist. When you are a kid, anything is possible. Never mind that you hate science, never mind that you have only ever seen dolphins in books and on TV, the world is your fucking oyster!

toomuchnews.com

My very first ambition in life was to be a dancer for Madonna. We had a little blue tape, a pirated copy of her album “Like a Virgin” that Dad would play in the car and I knew all the words, (though not what “virgin” meant). Now I look back and I am like damn, I could have done that! Madonna is 50-something years old but she is still dancing! Instead of touring the world and popping Cristal in the club, I sit in my little office typing proposals and reports like a trained monkey.

What happens as you grow up? I ask, but I know, I know because it happened to me. You tell someone on the playground you want to be Madonna’s dancer and they laugh in your face. You ask your mom for chocolate at the supermarket and she tells you “do you know how hard I work for this money? It doesn’t grow on trees you know.”

You tell your parents you want to study art as one of your A levels, instead of biology, which you are failing anyway and are told “you’re not going to spend my school fees finger painting with your hippy drug addict teacher, you will study Biology, and you will do it well!”

You decide you’re going to break free, live your dreams and study photography and they hold an intervention on your behalf. (On TV interventions the nice mzungu family sit you down and read you letters of how much they love you, in Africa they lock you in a room and beat you until you come to your senses).

How many of us ended up studying law, accounting, business, engineering RATHER than our passion? How many of us get a little buzz in our down-belows when we read torts or write proposals?

As a working man, you finally get fed up kissing your boss’ ass and hoping to get in a car accident every weekday morning. You decide that you’re going to do it now, quit your job, go into business and selling sand to the Arabs. You write an award-winning business plan, make an appointment with the bank for a loan, and hit up all your benevolent relatives for support. Then your girlfriend misses her period and your dream flies out the window.

Chris Devers flickr

I have heard it suggested that imagination and creativity a privilege; that when you are worrying about your next meal you don’t have time to create the next Mona Lisa.

I say, screw that.

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So…. what’s Vuga?

Vuga! is a word that features in many bantu languages.

In Kifumbira it means to talk or to speak

In Runyankole it means to advance or to push forward, “Okwevuga” is a traditional Ankole form of rapping, in which the heroic deeds of the individual being honoured are recited for the entertainment and information of an audience.

In isiZulu, Vuga means wake up!

The conversation about Africa has for too long been dominated by outsiders,  from the infamous Joseph Conrad book “The Heart of Darkness” to the latest CNN special on whatever African disaster is holding the West’s attention for the next 2.35 minutes.

Vuga! is an online project designed to provide a platform for young African voices. Here you will see African stories, African pictures and videos submitted by young people all over the continent who wish to see their Africa, represented in the media.

Vuga! runs on your contributions. Got a picture of you chilling at the beach with your friends? Send it to vugaafrica@gmail.com. A funny video shot on African soil? Send it to vugaafrica@gmail.com. An essay on music, culture or sport pertaining to Africa? Send it to vugaafrica@gmail.com. A fictional story about what you imagine the chapati-seller gets up to at night. Send it to vugaafrica@gmail.com

You get the point.

So SEND ME YOUR SUBMISSIONS!